Programs & Services

The New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs preserves, fosters, and interprets New Mexico’s diverse cultural heritage and expression for present and future generations, enhancing the quality of life and economic well-being of the state.

Plan Your Visit

Find hours, admission prices, directions, and other visiting information for New Mexico's eight state-run museums and seven historic sites.
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Culture's Economic Impact

Arts and culture are big business in New Mexico. A recent study, commissioned by DCA, reveals an annual economic impact of $5.6 billion.
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Explore Online

Online exhibitions and digital resources from the Department of Cultural Affairs, including online collections, databases, and educational materials.
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Upcoming Public Meetings

  • 6/4/2015 New Mexico Arts Commission
  • 6/12/2015 Cultural Properties Review Committee
  • 7/16/2015 Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents
  • 7/17/2015 New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science Board of Trustees
  • 7/31/2015 New Mexico Museum of Space History Commission

New Mexico CulturePass

Your ticket to 15 exceptional Museums and Historic Sites. From Indian treasures to space exploration, world-class folk art to awesome dinosaurs—our museums and monuments celebrate the essence of New Mexico every day.
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Featured DCA Exhibitions

John P. Stapp Air & Space Park

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.
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Cheryl Cathcart: In a World of Horses

Corrales, N.M. artist Cheryle Cathcart has combined her love of horses and photography in an amazing collection of images that capture the power and grace of the animals.
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New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.
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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

In an age when every cell phone can take a respectable picture, cameras as low-tech as an oatmeal box still beguile a legion of practitioners, both artistic and documentarian.
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